Myth Makers March 2, 2018

Paul Ryan, the Trojan Horse of American Politics

He’s a trickster, a conman, out to fool you and win at all costs, sparing no deception.

Tricksters pretend to be the benefactors of their world. They aren’t. Rather, they are a character in a story who exhibits a great degree of imagined intellect or secret knowledge they use to play tricks or circumvent normal rules. The trickster can appear as a coyote, a raven or other character or god, but it can transform itself into a man when in full deception mode. They are integral to understanding most cultures.

While Greek gods such as Prometheus, the god of fire, and Hermes the patron of thieves and lying, are more commonly seen as tricksters, Odysseus, the Greek name for Ulysses, did get in line for some of the trickery he used to sack Troy and to get back to Ithaca. An 12,000 line epic poem/song by Homer tells the tale. Here is the latest and best version, the first translated by a woman.

Paul Ryan has no songs. He claims to be the Speaker of the House (of Representatives). In fact he is only speaker for slightly more than half of the House. Something about a house divided comes to mind, a warning from Abraham Lincoln. He further claims to speak for the American People, a deception of gargantuan proportions. Ryan giveth with the large print and taketh away with the small print. He gestures with his left hand for inclusion and leads with right for exclusion. Spoiler alert: he is right-handed.

Update: Now we know (April 11, 2018) that The Trickster is going back to the Cheese State of Wisconsin. He is not running for re-election. The staggering development here (some saw it coming) is that Ryan is second-in-line to be president. Pence is first. Ryan next. If the Democrats take over the House (a possibility by the hapless ones), then a Democrat would be second in line to be president next January. Interesting. Look for that as a campaign strategy by the Republicans.

 

 

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The Greek chorus was an integral part of ancient Greek theatre, a group of three or four performers who looked alike and spoke all at the same time. Their part was to comment on what was being said and help the audience know what the characters in the play were thinking. The chorus usually sang, or spoke. We honor that tradition here
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“Don’t Lie”

I admit that I've been a little immature
With your heart like I was the predator
In my book of lies I was the editor
And the author, I posted my signature
And now I apologize for what I did to ya
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Paul Cook
London, UK

There is no room for war in a globalized world.